vegetables

Despite Danger, Staff & Participants Carry On

Even with the real and present danger of rebel groups storming the town of Gamboula and surrounding areas for many months, courageous program participants and the staff of local partner ACET have managed to find ways to carry on.
 
With the exception of the cattle program – the animals are a significant investment and are at high risk of being stolen – most other activities have made progress. The tree nursery, EDEN, raises and sells a variety of fruit and agroforestry trees, and also sells fruit from the mature trees for resale.   Training and monitoring on vegetable gardening, peanut farming, fish farming, and organizing co-ops and self-help groups have all seen good results as well.

Five new farmer co-ops with self-help and savings-and-loan components got off the ground this year and are working at getting their bylaws and government registrations taken care of.

Level-headed staff even found a work-around for processing palm nuts into oil for bottling and sale.  With people fleeing the area for stretches of time, it was hard to find laborers to do the work. Instead, staff is cutting the palm heads off the trees and selling them to women to process at home.  As Anick reports, “I’m able to take care of my four children thanks to the small garden work I have here at the ACET farm. I’ve even started a little business. I buy palm heads from ACET. Once I extract the oil, I sell a part of it so I have money to buy soap, salt, kerosene, and medicine and to cover my children’s needs. We use the other part for cooking, and sometimes my neighbors come to ask me for some for their families. The palm oil is rich, and less expensive than the peanut oil from Cameroon that is not available to the poor.”

Caption: Children block the view of sacks filled with a new farmer group’s first peanut harvest

CAR Gamboula Program
Led by Evangelical Covenant Church/Covenant World Relief and Local Partner ACET

10/09/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Out of Debt After Two Years of Environmentally-Friendly Farming

Mukesh, a young farmer who was saddled with an inherited debt and heavy family responsibilities, has paid off all his financial obligations with profits from his successful farm. He was able to celebrate this amazing achievement after two years, thanks to ag training and support he received from the program.

Mukesh and his wife, Jeetni, live with his grandfather, a brother, and their small son. Mukesh was six months old when his mother died and his father abandoned him, leaving him to live with his grandfather along with an unpaid debt for the purchase of a tractor. The grandfather continued to pay off the loan while teaching Mukesh about farming, and was able to send him to school until the seventh grade. When his grandfather grew too old to farm entirely by himself, Mukesh quit school to help him.

At 19, Mukesh married Jeetni and assumed responsibility for the farm and loan in addition to his family obligations, but by then the interest was so large that he struggled to keep up.

Around that time, the Bhatigachh program started helping farmers in his village, training them on growing vegetables, making their own organic fertilizer, insecticide, and pesticide, and how to irrigate their crops. Mukesh was glad to learn sustainable ways to improve his farming, grow a wider variety of vegetables, and market them locally. He’s leased 1.25 acres of land, and grows everything from leafy vegetables and gourds to tomatoes, chilies, okra, radish, cauliflower and beans. His monthly profits quickly allowed him to pay down the old loan, and within two years he was out of debt.

He is happy and thankful for the program, which came just at the right time when he was overwhelmed with problems.  Says Mukesh, “I am so grateful for your help.”

Caption: A smiling Mukesh harvests gourds destined for market

Nepal Bhatigachh program
Led by Mennonite Central Committee with Local Partner BICWS

09/26/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Life-Changing Ag Training

When Thoeun decided to take advantage of an opportunity to receive training on environmentally-friendly agriculture and raising animals organized by the Cambodia South program, she had no idea how much her life would change for the better. She was an ordinary Cambodian farmer who relied on growing rice to feed her family while her husband migrated to the city to work in the construction sector. Like many other families, theirs didn’t earn enough to support themselves. Her children did not go to school regularly because they were busy looking for crabs and snails in the fields to supplement their limited diet.

Determined to learn what she could, she took the instruction seriously.  She immediately began growing vegetables, using natural fertilizers, and raising a few chickens. She worked so hard that she was selected to become a “multi-purpose farmer.”  This meant receiving extra support and training so she could test new crops, varieties, and production-management techniques, then share what she learned with her neighbors. She put into practice whatever she learned, expanded her vegetable plot, and increased the number of chickens she raised. Now she not only produces enough to meet her family’s needs, but has extra to sell.

Because of her success, her husband was able to quit his job in the city and now helps her with the farm work. Her children are going to school regularly and no longer need to forage for food. Thoeun shows a high level of commitment to working hard on her farm and to teaching others in her community so that they, too, can not only grow enough to become food secure, but to thrive.

Caption: Thoeun on her multi-purpose farm plot

Cambodia South Program
Led by World Renew

09/13/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Self-Sufficiency Success

Wilfredo is experiencing success! He is a farmer who is using a variety of agricultural methods designed to overcome the challenges of drought, hail, and the freezing temperatures of the Peruvian Andes.  He says, “I like the whole process of growing vegetables. There’s always enough for my daughters to eat. What I sell most is lettuce and sweet peppers, not only here locally but also in town.”

Farm families in the program’s eight communities are growing greater quantities and varieties of vegetables, with enough left over to sell and earn an income. They are also improving their overall health by focusing on water sanitation, home and personal hygiene, and learning to prepare delicious and nutritious meals. Encouragingly, the previous phase of the program saw a significant reduction in child malnutrition. Children are eating a wider selection of healthy food, and their bodies are able to process nutrients more efficiently because their parents’ water sanitation efforts resulted in a decrease in water-borne diseases and parasites.

Luz, who owns some cows, says, “I’m learning how to make yogurt!  My children like it a lot. I’m planning on getting more cows so I can make enough yogurt to sell.”

The aim of the program is for participants to become self-sufficient. Janet says, “We are happy because we receive information on expenses – what happens with the money CEDINCO gets from the program.  We know that it doesn’t cover everything we do here, and we agree that we need to do our part and put in some money on our own.”

Caption: A cooking demonstration covers foods that reverse anemia

Peru Castrovirreyna Program
Led by Lutheran World Relief and Local Partner CEDINCO

07/18/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Community Greenhouses are Improving Lives

Juana is a member of a women’s collective greenhouse in her Guatemalan community. But long before she joined the program and began receiving instruction from local partner CIEDEG, she was watching and learning. She is a great example of how our food security programs reach “secondary beneficiaries” – those who are not officially registered, but whose lives improve just by taking note of what their neighbors are doing to grow more nutritious food.

Juana carefully observed how the greenhouses were constructed and saw the ways in which women began to grow a wider variety of foods both under cover and outdoors. She and her husband used their own savings to purchase a sheet of plastic in Guatemala City, and built a smaller version of the community greenhouses right next to their house. She bought some tomato seedlings and started other vegetables from seed in a small area of her greenhouse reserved as a nursery.

Now, in addition to the tender vegetables she grows indoors, Juana is also producing cool-weather veggies on her land, including carrots, broccoli, onion and celery. She was happy to be invited to join the community greenhouse collective as well to take advantage of the opportunity to grow even more food and market some of it along with the women in her collective.

CIEDEG encourages secondary beneficiaries like Juana to participate. It is the organization’s goal to expand access to a variety of healthy foods across the Nebaj area of Guatemala, and to empower families to stay intact by finding ways to earn incomes and flourish in their own villages.  Juana’s enthusiasm, willingness to innovate and success are inspiring others to try their hand at greenhouse production.

Caption: Juana in her greenhouse
Photo credit: Bethany Beachum


Guatemala Nebaj Quetzaltenango 
Led by Church World Service and Local Partner CIEDEG

06/11/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Diversification: Drought Insurance

Lissett says her diversified vegetable garden makes her feel stronger and more able to cope with crises. “We had a drought two years ago that affected all of us a lot. It made us poorer, but it also made us more intentional about growing more foods besides corn and beans, and finding other ways to make money.”

Her family had had financial challenges when she was growing up, so she was glad to join the program and improve her agricultural skills as a way to generate additional income. She’s been putting into practice the soil conservation techniques she’s learned from local partner CIEETS, and has built a water reservoir for irrigating her plants. “The training we receive helps us understand better how plants, soil and water all work together as part of one system.”

The drought made her get serious about planting a wider variety of fruits and vegetables to reduce the likelihood that she would lose everything if it happens again. She is now growing various citrus and other fruits, quiquisque (a starchy corm similar to taro root), banana, guava, yuca (cassava), sweet pepper and papaya. She’s also raising chickens. As she puts it, “My diversified plot ensures that I’ll have food to feed my family, and even have some surplus to sell at the market.”

In addition to diversifying her crops, Lissett also manages a rain gauge to inform her and her community when there is sufficient moisture to plant crops.

“My community and I thank all the people who collaborate with us to improve our situation. Rest assured that we are taking advantage of these resources that come to us through CIEETS,” says Lissett.

Caption: Lissett with rain gauge and records

Nicaragua Mateare Carazo Program
Led by Church World Service and Local Partner CIEETS

 

06/04/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Proud to be a Farmer

Rajib, a young farmer in Bangladesh, says, “I used to think that only poor people became farmers, but now I see agriculture as a noble profession. It is a source of income, nutrition, and food security. I’m proud to be a farmer.”

Until the program’s local partner SATHI offered agricultural training to this subsistence farmer, he’d been using techniques he’d learned as a child. When his father died, he’d had to quit school and take over the responsibility of their family farm. Because his father grew only rice, that’s what Rajib did as well. But, he said, “SATHI taught me rice alone cannot meet all the nutritional needs of our body.”

He joined a farmers group and learned about growing vegetables in kitchen gardens, fertilizing with organic compost, and managing pests with environmentally-friendly farming methods. The farmers group also functioned as a savings and lending group, and Rajib began saving regularly.  He was able to take a small loan from the group to buy a variety of seeds. SATHI staff and other skilled farmers were there to support and guide him in his new venture. He was amazed at the quantity and quality of all he was able to harvest -- spinach, red amaranth, long bean, eggplant, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, cucumber, tomato and sweet gourd. More than enough to feed his family and earn a small income.
 
Encouraged by his success, Rajib recently took a poultry-rearing workshop from SATHI which motivated him to purchase 10 chickens. He is now waiting for them to lay eggs and supply meat for his family.

Caption: Red amaranth growing in Rajib’s kitchen garden

Bangladesh Kendua Programs
Led by World Renew and Local Partner SATHI

Photo and storyline credit: Lipy Dhoni

05/24/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Bunthoeun Made the Grade and Now Teaches Others

Because of his success and hard work at learning a wide variety of environmentally-friendly farming techniques, Bunthoeun has made the grade. He was selected as one of the program’s model, multi-purpose farmers. He’s receiving additional training, and will go on to teach other farmers in his community.

Things weren’t always so great for Bunthoeun. In his 20s he moved to Thailand to look for work, and stayed for about a year. He was unhappy living so far from home, so he returned to his remote Cambodian village, took up rice farming and raising a few chickens again, and occasionally worked in construction in the village to earn a little cash.

When World Renew started a hands-on Farmer Field School nearby, he jumped at the chance to enroll and learn better ways of farming. He took advantage of every workshop and opportunity, eventually focusing most on expanding his chicken operations.

Like most farmers in the area, he used to grow only rice, and only one crop per year. He now produces rice, vegetables, fish and chickens throughout the year on the piece of land he received from his in-laws when he got married recently. He makes a good income from his farm by selling his surplus.  

Bunthoeun shows a high commitment to improving his agricultural knowledge. As a multi-purpose farmer, he will have a big impact on other farmers in his village by modeling innovation and sustainable farming practices.

Caption: Bunthoeun with poultry

Cambodia South Program
Led by World Renew and Various Local Partners
15 communities, 840 households, 3,600 individuals

03/06/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Getting Creative

María Francisca’s sales of her handmade soaps and hair gels may have started out modestly, but some small-business training has helped her take them to the next level. She initially sold what she made to neighbor women. Word-of-mouth advertising reached a beauty salon in a nearby town which now stocks her products. As a single mother of five, she’s grateful for the additional income.

Since many men in these indigenous Maya Mam communities have migrated for work, local partner CIEDEG staff prioritizes women, food security, and income opportunities as they develop programs. Kitchen gardens are popping up everywhere thanks to training on growing vegetables. If there’s any extra to sell, the women use what they earn to buy school supplies or to cover household expenses.

Women’s groups, or Sociedades Femininas, often meet in churches to share their experiences, organize, or receive training. A workshop on nutrition and creative cooking led to experimentation: radish leaves in omelets, anyone?

Besides María Francisca, other entrepreneurs have felt encouraged to act on their great ideas. Lucía and her sister started a small grocery store in the front room of their home. And three sisters – Juana, Catarina and Santa – have capitalized on their cooking skills to open a small restaurant. In addition to coffee, smoothies, and standard-fare meals, Juana makes chocolate-dipped bananas and, her own inspiration, chocolate-dipped orange slices.

Photo caption: María Francisca shows her wares
Credit: Bethany Beachum, CWS

Guatemala Nebaj-Quetzaltenango Program
Led by Church World Service and local partner CIEDEG
20 Communities, 771 households, 3,855 individuals

02/08/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Marshila's Transformative Nutrition Education

Marshila says her life has been transformed by the India Banka Dumka Jamui program’s emphasis on agriculture, nutrition and sanitation.  As a child bride, she had little knowledge about the world or ways to improve her family’s health. To her, food was for filling the belly to have the energy to work. The family generally ate only rice and potatoes and, even though lemons, guava and custard apple grew in their yard, Marshila did not know enough about them to add them to meals.

She always wondered how she could save her children from disease and malnutrition, so when the program offered agriculture and nutrition training in her village she jumped at the chance.

The first training she received through her Self-Help Group (SHG) helped her to understand the importance of nutrient-rich foods and a diversified diet for good health.  She learned about “Tri-color Meals” – white for carbohydrates, green for vegetables, and yellow for protein-rich legumes. She now grows vegetables in her kitchen garden and has learned delicious ways to serve them. She has taken to heart the lessons on the importance of a clean home environment, and her children think it’s fun to wash their hands before meals.

Marshila’s SHG also gives workshops on dramatically increasing rice yields, and basic animal husbandry and veterinary skills for caring for goats. Women in her remote village, formerly isolated and hopeless, now feel they are part of the larger world. Their SHG and Village Organization belong to a wider federation whose members share knowledge and envision transformation.

Photo caption: Kitchen gardening improves family health
Photo courtesy of LWR

India Banka Dumka Jamui Program
Led by Lutheran World Relief and local partner PRADAN
12 communities, 640 households, 2,163 individuals

 

12/20/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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