sheep

"Pass on the Gift" Provide Families with Nutrition and Income


In remote Armenian mountain villages, employment opportunities are hard to come by and life is a challenge.  Gifts of chickens, lambs and beehives passed from one neighbor to the next mean nutrition and income for hungry and poor families.

Uncle Jahan, who cares for his disabled wife and carries out all house and garden chores, has worked hard all his life.  He saw low yields due to the harsh climate, depleted soil and lack of seeds. He was delighted to receive four beehives from a neighbor, and expects a good honey harvest this year. The lime blossom honey cheers and nourishes his wife, and the income from honey sales allows them to move beyond subsistence to hoping and dreaming again. Jahan also joined a training event on healthy meals intended for community women. “Why not?” he smiled. “I do all the cooking.”

A younger villager, Shoger, supports her family of three as well as her disabled brother and his three children. Thanks to the 15 chickens and a rooster she received, she now has 10-12 eggs a day.  Shoger says, “For a mother, the most desirable thing is to have healthy children and provide proper meals. These chickens are one of the best things that ever happened in my life. My thanks to all the wonderful and kind people living in the U.S. who have thought about us so far away.”

Photo caption: Children help deliver chicks

Armenia FHSLD Program
Led by United Methodist Committee on Relief
3 communities, 156, households, 352 individuals

12/11/2017 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

An FRB/4H partnership in Fremont, MI helps farmers overseas

The Fremont area Foods Resource Bank (FRB) Growing Project, in partnership with the John Deere Foundation (JDF) and local 4-H clubs, has been honored to have Lydia Breen (Ensley/Newaygo Co. 4-H) and Brendan Carroll (Grant Livestock 4-H) join them in “growing lasting solutions to world hunger.” 

The purpose of this collaboration, new in 2014,is to encourage agricultural learning among 4-H youth and to teach them about the development work FRB carries out overseas to help reduce world hunger.

10/18/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Getting Ready for the Harsh Winter in Armenia

Newsletter: 

Participants in FRB’s Armenia-Shirak program are benefiting from their sheep in a way most Americans would not think of. Winter temperatures in Shirak Province – remote and mountainous and the coldest area in the country – can plummet to minus 30 degrees F. Families spend much of the year getting ready for this long and severe season. They preserve food by the gallon and keep it in storage for winter, and buy or collect wood in advance. If they have sheep, however, they can use the manure for heating their houses.

The two program communities have received aid and assistance from many sectors since the devastating 1988 earthquake but continue to experience poverty, food insecurity, and shrinking numbers as men and entire families emigrate for work. Armenia-Shirak’s developmental approach takes in the high level of social solidarity

11/22/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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